Be Internet Awesome

We’ve been using a pretty great resource from our friends at Google this year to kick off our conversations about digital citizenship and digital literacy. There’s an entire curriculum titled Be Internet Awesome for teachers and students to navigate through. What I like about it is there are teacher-led activities and there is also an online game component that reinforces what the lesson’s focus was. So far we’ve tackled privacy, sharing, and settings within apps to limit access, and phishing scams.

One of the biggest mistakes I see a lot of teachers make is assuming our students know how to interact with technology in a school setting. We know students grow up with devices and are constantly connected. It’s easy to assume our students know how to use technology and will utilize it appropriately in a classroom setting. But, similar to how we embrace discipline in our schools with Culturally Responsive Positive Behavior Intervention Systems, so too do students need to be taught how to use technology.

The Digital Citizenship movement has been gaining traction for several years in education, but I have always found it to be a little lacking. So much of the focus was on what NOT to do, stranger danger, etc. and less on the why we need to learn how to make these types of choices with technology. Students need the opportunity to explore when we should trust someone with information, what signs to look for, and thinking through what may or may not happen in a given scenario. While students KNOW what they’re supposed to do, they don’t always do it. And neither do we as adults, right? I mean, I know I’m supposed to get 3-5 servings of vegetables every day, but I don’t always do it.

So our conversations with students have to be about more than just what we know we should and shouldn’t do. We have to educate them on the why and the reasons behind our expectations around any behavior – whether technology is involved or not. Of course, it starts with relationships and creating an environment of trust and openness. We have to establish and maintain rapport with our students, we can’t ask them to take risks while at the same time sending the message that we don’t trust them by banning sites or cell phones.

How are you teaching your students to Be Internet Awesome? 

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