The Innovator’s Mindset – Week 4 (Chapters 4 & 5)

Sometimes life happens…and I have been buried in work! You can read about the first three weeks of the book study here, here, and here.

Chapter Four focuses on the importance of relationships in driving innovation in classrooms, buildings, and districts. My student teaching experience was in a 7th grade classroom, and I understood early on that having a relationship with them was crucial to being a successful teacher. This shouldn’t be mind-blowing knowledge; we tend to work better for people whom we respect and feel respected by. Too often, though, this important aspect of growth is overlooked in the name of getting stuff done.

George asks, “How do you create opportunities for your school community to have learning driven by their personal interests?” I try to keep this idea at the fore when designing learning opportunities for my teachers. Through the summer, I host open office hours for teachers to drop in and get individualized attention. Teachers really appreciate the chance to sit down one on one and discuss an idea or get some troubleshooting done on a tool or app. I have also begun doing these office hours with a couple of schools. They hire a floating sub and teachers sign up for a 45 minute session with me. Here, I can show a new tool or – even more effective – speak to the teacher about their content and curricular goals and brainstorm ways to utilize technology to modify student learning.

Adjacent to the idea of having relationships with your staff and learners is how to be an effective leader. My first principal was a person I respected and who I knew respected me. He was always ready to listen, offer support when necessary, asked deep, thought-provoking questions, and challenged some of my actions when he wanted me to see something from a different angle. He also was a great leader. He listened to staff concerns but also pushed us to take our teaching to the next level. He truly “got it.” Being an effective leader isn’t easy, and I’m sure all of us have worked for or with people who were ineffective at leading people.

I love this quote:

In a world where digital interaction is the norm, we crave human interaction more than ever. That’s why the three things you need to ensure innovation flourishes in your organization are relationships, relationships, and relationships. Fifty years ago, relationships were the most important thing in our schools, and fifty years from now, it will be no different.

Chapter Five lays out the eight characteristics of The Innovative Leader: Visionary, Empathetic, Models Learning, Open Risk-Taker, Networked, Observant, Team Builder, and Always Focused on Relationships. Being an Open Risk-Taker means you are taking risks “out in the open” so that others can see you doing it. I did this a lot with my students. Sometimes we forget that we ask kids to be uncomfortable a lot – and expect them to do it without complaint. But when we are asked to do something we don’t want to do or aren’t comfortable with, we resist. Sometimes a lot. Taking risks and being vulnerable in front of others isn’t always in our comfort zone. But by showing we trust those around us enough to be supportive of our risk-taking, we are able to grow as leaders and members of a community.
One of the areas I need to improve upon is being more Empathetic. I have such energy and passion for technology and how it can create connections among students, teachers, and others around the world, when others are hesitant to jump in  – or don’t quite see how it will all come together – I get frustrated. It’s hard to remember sometimes that not everyone is at my level of knowledge when it comes to technology tools or what’s available. Figuring out where people are and being able to move them from THEIR Point A to THEIR Point B (thanks for this idea, George!) is important rather than just pushing them to move from where they are to where I think they should be.

Discussion Questions: (Chapter 4)

  1. How do you build relationships with individuals in your district, school, and classroom?
  2. How do you empower others to take risks? Examples?
  3. How do you create opportunities for your school community to have learning driven by their personal interests?

Discussion Questions: (Chapter 5)

  1. What are some ways that you get in the “middle” of learning to understand the needs of those you serve?
  2. What is a new learning initiative that you would like to see in your school, and how do you model this learning yourself?
  3. Which characteristic of the innovative leader do you consider personal strengths? In which areas do you need to grow?
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