Global Read Aloud

I first heard about the Global Read Aloud movement at ISTE. Josh Stumpenhorst showcased Pernille Ripp in his Keynote address. You can read more about the history of the Global Read Aloud here, but the jist is for classrooms to read a book and find another classroom to connect with. Teachers have the opportunity to recommend a book and then they vote on their top choices. There are generally several books to choose from at each grade level. For younger learners, there is often an author study with the option to read several picture books by the same author. Using Edmodo, Twitter, Skype, Google Hangouts, Padlet, and blogs, teachers find classrooms to connect with. It’s an awesome way to engage students in a read aloud that goes beyond your normal classroom discussion. Plus, students love seeing other kids in another part of the world and connecting with them.

This year, motivated by the awesome Keynote address Pernille gave at the Michigan Google Fest in September, I reached out to teachers at Lewton Elementary, a magnet school whose focus is on Global Studies and Spanish Immersion, to see if they would be interested in getting on board. As an incentive, I offered to purchase the books for the teachers. It was a small investment for a really valuable experience for kids. All three teachers who participated chose the book Fish in a Tree.

The author of the beloved One for the Murphys gives readers an emotionally-charged, uplifting novel that will speak to anyone who’s ever thought there was something wrong with them because they didn’t fit in.

“Everybody is smart in different ways. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its life believing it is stupid.”

Ally has been smart enough to fool a lot of smart people. Every time she lands in a new school, she is able to hide her inability to read by creating clever yet disruptive distractions.  She is afraid to ask for help; after all, how can you cure dumb? However, her newest teacher Mr. Daniels sees the bright, creative kid underneath the trouble maker. With his help, Ally learns not to be so hard on herself and that dyslexia is nothing to be ashamed of. As her confidence grows, Ally feels free to be herself and the world starts opening up with possibilities. She discovers that there’s a lot more to her—and to everyone—than a label, and that great minds don’t always think alike.

Source: http://www.amazon.com/Fish-Tree-Lynda-Mullaly-Hunt/dp/0399162593

So far, we have connected using Padlet with two classrooms – one in Australia and one in California. It has been really neat to have students learn from other students in other parts of the world. This week, we used Swivl to record students talking about their favorite part of Fish in a Tree so far. We will be sharing these video reflections with our friends in California and Australia. You can check out their reflections on our YouTube page.

We also have plans to connect via Skype with a 4th grade classroom in Colorado. I cannot wait for this! Last year, our 2nd graders Mystery Skyped with a classroom in Iowa, and it was a blast. I’m looking forward to seeing our older kiddos connecting over a shared experience.

Your Turn: Have you participated in the Global Read Aloud? How? 

 

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