Do as I Say, Not as I Do…

Why is innovation critical? The other day, General Motors announced that it will be laying off 1,100 workers in the Lansing area. Their plant that currently produces the GMC Acadia is cutting its third shift, and all of those jobs are going to Tennessee. This is the fourth layoff they’ve announced since November 2016. Here in Lansing, we have also endured Oldsmobile – a company born and bred in the Capital City – closing its plant and ceasing to exist as a product. Michigan’s auto industry and its struggles shouldn’t be much of a surprise to anyone who lived through the Great Recession. And while in many ways GM and Chrysler are doing much better, it’s easy to look around and see the effects of the Great Recession on the local economy. Across the board, more and more jobs are being lost to automation and advances in technology – not to “bad trade deals” as a certain leader has alluded to…

Listening to the YouTube Live this week, a couple of things stuck out to me:

“The jobs that can be automated eventually will be. That’s why we need innovators.” – George Couros

I couldn’t agree more. There is vast opportunity for new jobs, to solve complex problems, to fill an existing need, and to generate a lot of money for local, state, and national economies. Obviously on a micro level, a new job that fills a need could be very lucrative for someone, on a macro level, in order to stay relevant we must change and innovate. And yet…we are still working on outdated machines and within models that were designed to solve 20th century needs. It’s pretty crazy when you think about it.

A place where I see this dichotomy is in education – in professional learning specifically. George referenced that a lot of the problems in education aren’t from the teachers themselves, but from their leadership. I (mostly) agree with this. We ask a LOT of teachers – collect an inane amount of data, differentiate, be innovative, integrate technology to a high level, reinforce social skills, teach curriculum, support all learners all of the time in culturally-relevant ways, etc. While all of these things (aside from the overwhelming data collection…) are essential to supporting students and helping them learn and grow, it can be really hard to do, especially when you’re being asked to do things you’ve never done before. Having leadership that models and brainstorms with you ways to be more innovative and feel like you have permission to try new things.

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We had a PD day not long ago on implementing our new math curriculum. Rather than giving people time to share ways they have used the different components in their classes, the PD was focused on the “nuts and bolts” and reviewing (for the umpteenth time!) the online resources available. While that is helpful for some people, other teachers benefit from hearing how their colleagues are changing their teaching strategies.

Another example I see time and time again is asking teachers for feedback – on a paper survey – and only at the end of a session. While feedback is an incredibly powerful tool, it needs to be done throughout the process, and there are ways we can utilize technology to make it more efficient.

I loved Sarah’s thoughts around good leaders providing support and space for their teachers. It’s kind of reminiscent of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs – we need to feel cared for and loved before we can do anything else. Teachers need to know that their leaders have their backs and they have the opportunity to capitalize on their strengths and fly. When I was still in the classroom, I was never afraid of trying a new technology out with my students because I knew that they would figure it out – and teach me something new in the process. Teaching 8th grade students about the Constitutional Convention (prior to the Hamilton craze) could be somewhat challenging to make it meaningful and relevant for them. So I worked on ways to create innovative learning experiences. We made videos that parodied reality shows – Real Housewives of Colonial America for example. Students had to really KNOW that material in order to create a coherent and accurate video. But, I wouldn’t have had the courage to do that if I didn’t have a principal who understood that my ability to connect with students on their level was a strength and I needed the space to be able to do that.

How do we move more leaders and teachers in this direction? I truly believe a culture shift in how we define professional learning opportunities is crucial. Teachers willingly give up their weeknights and Saturdays to engage in Twitter chats or attend EdCamps because they have control over the type of learning they experience. These types of learning opportunities also provide teachers the time they so desperately need to really think through challenges, create innovative projects and lessons, to collaborate, and to connect. Additionally, there needs to be an expectation – and accountability – that the provided time is really being used for that purpose. While there is value in spending 5-10 minutes “venting” about the problems, it’s not the most productive use of your 60 minute PLC time – EVERY week. Or half listening while grading papers and responding to email while your colleagues are speaking – it’s rude and unprofessional. I get it; I taught middle school for 4 years, often had 180 English essays to grade, etc. But at the same time, we would not accept that behavior from our students, so why do we think it’s okay for us to do that? Teachers and administrators need to change the culture of professional learning – space and support – but also accountability and professionalism.

What say you? How can we create more innovative learning experiences for teachers and administrators?

#IMMOOC – Season Two

Last night some pretty smart people kicked off another round of the #IMMOOC – The Innovator’s Mindset Massive Open Online Course focused around the book – The Innovator’s Mindset. I participated last year, but when I heard there was going to be another round of the IMMOOC, I was thrilled. It’s always fun to connect with new people and challenge your own thoughts and ideas.

One of the questions from this week is centered around the idea of the purpose of school. What is it we are actually trying to do with our students? For me, as a former social studies teacher and current technology integration specialist, the purpose of education is to teach students how to engage with the world around them. They obviously need content knowledge to contextualize their ideas, but we really need to support our students in analyzing information, formulating their own opinions, creating new and innovative things to change our world and their experiences with it, and to find creative ways to solve problems.

I always get push back from teachers whenever I bring up the idea of innovation and design thinking. It can be really hard to find the time, but, like most things in life, you make time for the things that are important to you. In the YouTube Live Episode 1, John Spencer said something that stuck out to me: “Curriculum maps are just that – maps. Maps should inspire possibilities.” Too many times teachers get stuck in marching through the curriculum, stuck on one path and not veering off from it or incorporating other standards and curriculum into what they’re teaching.

My favorite part of the episode? When George discussed some pushback he got from a teacher – “Innovation isn’t in the curriculum.” His response: “Yeah, well neither are worksheets.” Right!?! I mean…we do things we KNOW are bad for kids because it’s what we know, it’s what we’re comfortable with, it’s “easy.” This isn’t to say that there aren’t teachers out there who aren’t doing innovative things or out-of-the-box thinking. A challenge I see a lot is that the environment in which a lot of our teachers are currently operating in isn’t always conducive to innovation. It can be hard to take a risk when you feel like your administrator doesn’t have your back.

So how do we get more innovation in our schools given the current climate? I think it’s crucial to talk to kids since they’re the ones we’re in this business for! Kids can solve some pretty interesting problems if we give them the chance! When we do what’s best for kids, we begin to push kids to take ownership of their learning and to show what they know in new and innovative ways.

Podcasting

If you’re like me, podcasts have completely taken over your listening preferences. I listen to pods while I’m getting ready for work, running, driving to work (which reminds me, I really need to cancel that XM subscription…), cleaning the house, etc. They are awesome and FREE, which is even better.

This year I decided to challenge myself and get a little bit outside of my comfort zone. I started a podcast! Wha!? It’s pretty sweet, and for the 3 people who subscribe, I hope you’re enjoying the content! Fun fact, there’s more to it than just recording yourself. The hardest part was going through the process of how you share the podcast once you have it created.

Thanks to my PLN, Twitter, and Google, I decided on Shout Engine as the host for the podcast. Once you have a place to host it, you also then need to use the RSS feed to submit to iTunes. It’s a bit of a process. But, now that I have the workflow down, it’s pretty neat. I’m co-hosting the podcast with my coworker Eric Spicer, who is a Technology Integration Specialist at Averill, one of the schools in our district. The two of us try to have a digestible how-to video or technique to implement and we also end the podcast with a short tech tip. Our goal is to eventually get teachers using podcasts in their classrooms – as learning supplements and eventually as ways for students to showcase their work.

You can check out our podcast on iTunes or on Shout Engine. Let us know what you think!

What podcasts do you listen to?
How do you use podcasts in your classroom/professional sphere?

Training Challenges

I’m so excited to be kicking off 2017 with some new training offerings for teachers. It also means I get to play around on Canva and create some awesome flyers. I’m seriously obsessed with that site; it’s so addictive!

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I’m continuing to work on getting more schools within our district using G-Suite to a higher level. It is a challenge to balance these offerings with other, non-Google trainings, since not every school in the district is a Google school (yet). That may be another blog post for another time…Consistency, people!

Here’s what I’m struggling with, and my situation may be unique to my particular district, but perhaps some of the challenges will resonate with you.

  1. The teachers in this district have vastly different technology skill levels and desires to learn more technology. For example, I worked with a teacher today who did not know how to attach a Word document to an email. I have had other teachers wanting me to show them ways to get their students podcasting. We’re all over the map here. How can you offer a training that is inclusive, meets the needs of the attendees, and is high quality? I know this is a challenge teachers struggle with in their classrooms, too.
  2. There is no time. Literally, there is no time. The teachers do not have a planning period. After school is often filled with clubs, meetings, interventions, etc. Often I am sitting with a teacher trying to plan, while he or she is managing a classroom. It’s certainly not ideal, and really not even functional. There must be other schools out there that have some time challenges. How do you address them?
  3. Unpreparedness. Now, this is not a knock on teachers personally. I used to be in the classroom, and I get it – you make hundreds of decisions every single hour. How can you be expected to remember usernames and passwords, too?! Right. Everything requires a username and password these days, so finding a system that works is crucial. (And by that I don’t mean a list of passwords taped to your desk next to your computer…) I continue to provide a “You will need _____” list with my training offerings so that teachers know. And yet…I still struggle with teachers being able to access their accounts or bring their devices to a technology training.

A  lot of this is cultural change and shifts in expectation. For a lot of teachers, they are used to low-quality, sit and get PD, presented by someone who doesn’t know them and isn’t invested in their role in the District. So many companies include PD when you purchase their products, but it is often a one-and-done kind of thing, and teachers have been conditioned to know that these types of trainings are not very engaging and often not all that useful. I continue to keep high standards for my teachers. While I cannot provide one-on-one support for all teachers in all 27 schools, I am doing my best to provide a comprehensive set of training sessions as well as continue to work on building relationships. Capacity building is huge, so I have worked to identify teachers who are tech leaders in their buildings and tap into their willingness to try new things.

How do you handle some of these challenges? 
Any suggestions you’d like to share? 

The System

I’ve been spending a lot of time in professional development – in book studies, Twitter chats, reading and engaging with blogs, and talking with other teachers and ed tech coaches at events – and I’m really confused.

It seems like so much has changed in education and yet nothing has changed. We know better how students learn. The skills and demands that students will be expected to have are far different than those that existed when I went to school. Our world is much more connected. Technology and access to information inundates and sometimes overwhelms us. It can feel impossible to process all that information sometimes. And yet… I still walk into classrooms and see teachers refusing to let students engage with the world. I hear teachers tell students not to touch anything until they are given explicit instruction. I watch students puzzle and problem-solve on their own, but then shut down when forced to follow along step by step with a teacher or trainer. The thing is, adults feel safe when someone tells them what to do step by step. Kids don’t! Think of a toddler. How does he or she learn? A little boy puzzles over how to get the block into a hole; he tries several holes until he finds the shape that matches the block.

We want students to be problem solvers. We want them to be critical thinkers. Students no longer need us to TELL them what they need to know, we need to show them how to find the answers. We need to teach them HOW to assess and analyze the information they’re given. Students need to apply the knowledge they have in ways that are meaningful, make sense, challenge them.

Nothing is going to change in education until we – the system – changes. We have to get comfortable with being uncomfortable. We have to be okay with giving up some control. We have to be alright with students exploring – and maybe stumbling upon something they shouldn’t. And when they do, we capitalize on that and use it as a teachable moment. If we only tell kids what NOT to do – and punish them when they make a mistake – how likely are they to actually try and innovate?

Sharing Stories

Last week I had the pleasure of working with one of my favorite people and her awesome students. She’s a reading specialist here in Lansing and last year I introduced her to the Global Read Aloud last year and she read Fish in a Tree with her students. This year, her kiddos are reading Pax, and, like me, they have all fallen in love with the story of a young boy and his pet fox.

One of the things we love about the GRA is that it allows students to make connections over a common story with people from all over the world. It’s so validating for students to be able to hear people commenting on their ideas and opinions, asking them questions, and making connections.

On Thursday, the students and I used the iPad app Shadow Puppet to create short videos about their favorite character in the book. Prior to my lesson with the students, Mrs. Jacobs had the kids draw a picture of a scene from the book that included their favorite character. They also had a script of what they wanted to say, since some students freeze up when they have to record themselves! After a quick lesson on how to use Shadow Puppet, the kids were off to the races. It was awesome to listen to their explanations about why they chose a particular character.

After everyone recorded their videos, we uploaded them to YouTube. Then I got to sit with the students and Mrs. Jacobs and talk about what they had read so far. I have read the whole book, so the students were anxious to pick my brain about what happens in the book. It was fun to hear their questions and to not really answer any of them, because no one REALLY wants to know how it ends before you get to it!

We are a bit behind the official reading schedule for the Global Read Aloud, but we are really enjoying the deep dive and discussing the book. We’d love to connect with you over Google Hangouts or Skype. Let me know!

 

Trying to Process…

Happy Friday, friends!

After Tuesday’s election and the early Wednesday morning results, I found myself deeply saddened by the outcome. Admittedly, I was going to be very sad when President Obama left office. I have been inspired by his leadership, vision, exemplars, and policies. Any person coming in to replace him was not going to make me happy. However, I cannot help but feel a profound sense of sadness and fear at the prospect of president-elect Trump. I do not tend to agree with most Republican policies, but I can appreciate that Republicans have differing views than my own, and mostly have reasoned and nuanced details on why they hold those positions. This feels different. I do not support hated, racism, intolerance, misogyny, or xenophobia.

On Wednesday I felt like I just needed to take a few minutes to process my thoughts and get some ideas off my chest. For what it’s worth, here is my reflection.